An unlawful camping ordinance goes into effect this week in Elk Grove – KCRA Sacramento | Gmx Pharm

OWNERSHIP FOR UP TO 90 DAYS. MONTHS AFTER ELK GROVE ESTABLISHED AN AD HOC COMMITTEE TO COMBAT HOMELESSNESS IN THE CITY, AN RULE RELATING TO UNLAWFUL CAMPING IS NOW IN EFFECT. >> I CAN UNDERSTAND THIS BECAUSE THERE ARE CHILDREN INVOLVED. BUT WHAT DO YOU EXPECT FROM US? I mean we don’t have to go anywhere, that’s why we’re out here. REPORTER: BECAUSE UNRESIDENT RESIDENTS WONDER WHAT THIS MEANS. >> I THINK THAT INFORMATION SHOULD BE AVAILABLE TO US FASTER. REPORTER: CITY OFFICIALS SAY THE PURPOSE BEHIND THIS ACTION IS TO HELP THEM TRANSITION FROM HOMELESSNESS. >> THIS WILL NOT BE A PRINCIPLE RIGHT OUT OF THE GATES. THERE WILL BE LOTS OF EDUCATION AT THE FRONT END, LOTS OF DIALOGUE. REPORTER: THE REGULATIONS THAT GOED INTO EFFECT THIS WEEK PROHIBITED CAMPING WITHIN 500 FEET OF NURSERIES, SCHOOLS, PLAYGROUNDS OR TEACHING CENTERS. AND STOCK. >> IT LIMIT STOCKS. WHAT SIZE CAN IT BE AND WHAT CAN BE STORED IN IT. IT IS BECOME A REAL PUBLIC SAFETY CONCERN FOR THOSE EXPERIENCED HOMELESSNESS AND RESIDENTS. REPORTER: CRYSTAL AND SHARON, WHO HAVE A STORAGE AREA IN COMMON, SAY THAT ALTHOUGH THEY HAVE BEEN FORCED TO MOVE THE LOCATION IN THE PAST, THEY HAVE NOT BEEN OFFERED ANY RESOURCES. >> IT IS ACTUALLY VERY DIFFICULT TO GET OUT OF THIS SITUATION. When I first became homeless, I didn’t want to be homeless. >> IF YOU WANT TO COME AND CHANGE US DON’T TELL US WHERE WE GO, WHERE WE CAN CAMP, WHERE WE CAN BE. BEING HOMELESS IS NOT A CRIME. AT LEAST THAT SHOULD NOT BE. REPORTER: UNDER THIS MEASURES, CAMPSITES MUST ALSO BE KEPT CLEAN, AND THEY ARE PROHIBITED FROM BLOCKING OR PREVENTING ACCESS TO PUBLIC FACILITIES, SIDEWALKS AND OTHER PUBLIC WAYS. INDIVIDUALS AS CONFESSED IN THEIR PROPERTY HAVE A 90 DAY PERIOD TO RETAIN IT UNLESS CITY OFFICIALS CONFIRM IT IS NOT SECURE. SEVERAL DIFFERENT COUNTS IN ELCHHAIN SHOW THAT ANYWHERE BETWEEN 45 TO 150 PEOPLE EXPERIENCE HOMELESSNESS.

An unlawful camping ordinance goes into effect in Elk Grove this week

An unlawful camping ordinance went into effect in the town of Elk Grove this week, just months after the town established an ad hoc Affordable Housing Committee focused on discussing issues related to homelessness “causes health and safety problems According to District 3 councilman Kevin Spease, multiple censuses have indicated that there are between 45 and 150 people in the city affected by homelessness, playgrounds or youth centers. Occupying a campground greater than 150 square feet measured from the center of the main living area of ​​the entire campground. occupancy of a warehouse. Failing to keep camping areas clean and free of garbage, debris and waste, including hazardous waste and/or human waste. Camping in structures that an authorized city official deems unsafe for human use. Breaking or damaging lo cks on public facilities for camping purposes. Blocking or impeding access of public employees or agents to public facilities could first be notified of temporary or permanent accommodation services, then receive written notification and finally their property could be temporarily confiscated. Owners have 90 days to claim their confiscated possessions unless a city official determines there is a health condition or safety hazard. With Elk Grove residents wondering what this means, city officials say this measure is designed to help them emerge from homelessness — lots of front-end education, lots of dialogue,” said Pat Hume, District 2 Councilor Crystal Shetka and Sharon Fine, who share a camp area, says that although they have been forced to move in the past they have not been offered any resources.”I can understand that because there are children but where do you expect us to go? I mean , we obviously have nowhere to go, so that’s why we’re out here,” Fine said. “Being homeless isn’t a crime. At least it shouldn’t be,” Shetka said. An earlier draft of the measure would have included a $100 fine for Violations included, but District 2 councilman Kevin Spease told KCRA 3 that “stacking it with $100 fines only makes it harder for these organizations trying to get into homes The fine was removed from the final regulation.

A This week, an illegal camping ordinance went into effect in the town of Elk Grove, just months after the town established an ad hoc Affordable Housing Committee focused on discussing issues related to homelessness.

The city council cites that illegal camping in the city has “resulted in public health and safety issues.”

According to District 3 councilman Kevin Spease, multiple censuses have indicated that homelessness affects between 45 and 150 people in the city.

Bans under the new regulation

  • Camping within 500 feet of daycare, school, playground or youth center.
  • Occupying a campground greater than 150 square feet measured from the center of the main living area of ​​the entire campground.
  • occupying a camp.
  • Failing to keep camping areas clean and free of garbage, debris and waste, including hazardous waste and/or human waste.
  • Camping in structures that an authorized city official deems unsafe for human use.
  • Picking or damaging locks on public facilities for camping purposes.
  • Block or impede access by public officials or agents to public facilities.
  • Block, impede or interfere with access to public facilities, sidewalks and/or other public pathways.

Offenders are first informed about services for temporary or permanent accommodation, then receive a written decision and finally their property can be temporarily confiscated.

Owners can reclaim their confiscated possessions within 90 days unless a city official determines it poses a health or safety risk.

While Elk Grove residents wonder what that means, city officials say this measure aims to help them transition out of homelessness.

“This will not be an immediate crackdown, there will be a lot of reconnaissance on the front end, a lot of dialogue,” District 2 councilor Pat Hume said.

Crystal Shetka and Sharon Fine, who share a storage area, say that although they have been forced to relocate in the past, they have not been offered any resources.

“I can understand that because there are children, but where should we go? I mean, we obviously don’t have to go anywhere, so that’s why we’re out here,” Fine said.

“Being homeless is not a crime. At least it shouldn’t be,” Shetka said.

A previous draft of the measure would have included a $100 fine for violations, but District 2 councilman Kevin Spease told KCRA 3 that “stacking [homeless individuals] with $100 fines only makes it harder for the organizations trying to get in [affordable] Houses.”

The fine was removed from the final regulation.

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