Elk Grove City Council Strengthens City Bylaws to Prevent Illegal Camping and Camps – KCRA Sacramento | Gmx Pharm

REPORTER: WHILE THE MEETING AGENDA IS SEVERAL PAGES LONG, COUNCIL LEADERS TAKEN SOME TIME TONIGHT TONIGHT DISCUSSING THE ISSUES AROUND CAMNGPI AND THE ENCLOSURES AROUND ELK GROVE. WHILE THEY DID NOT AGREE ON TIME AND HOW THESE CHANGES should come about, everyone agreed that changes needed to be made. THE ELK GROVE CITY COUNCIL WOULD LIKE TO DO MORE, SAY, TO HELP PEOPLE EXPERIENCING HOMELESSNESS BUT JUST LIKE TDOO THAT LEAD TO A LONG DISCUSSION ABOUT PROPOSED CITY TEMPLATE CHANGES DURING THE COUNCIL’S WEDNESDAY MEETING. >> MEET ON THURSDAY NIGHT. WE KNOW MOST OF THEIR NAMES. WE KNOW WHO YOU ARE. OF COURSE WE ALSO WANT TO HELP WITH THE TRANSITION FROM THIS SITUATION. REPORTER: THE COUNCIL ESTABLISHED A COMMITTEE IN MARCH TO INVESTIGATE CONCERNS AND DISCOVER NEW WAYS TO LOOK AT THE PROBLEM IN ORDER TO ADVANCE WHAT THEY WEDNESDAY CALLED A HANDLEABLE SITUATION. >> THE ENCAMPMENT PROCESSES ARE OUT OF HAND AND WE HAVE TO TAKE ACTION. REPORTER: THE AMENDMENTS CONTAINS SEVERAL ARTICLES, INCLUDING A BAN ON CAMPING WITHIN 500 FEET OF A SCHOOL, A BAN ON CAMPS OF FOUR OR MORE PERSONS WITHIN 50 FEET OF EACH OTHER, AND A REQUIREMENT THAT CAMPS BE KEPT. WE CAN TALK ABOUT THE CARROTS WE HAVE BUT IF WE DON’T HAVE STK WE HAVE NOTHING FOR OFFICERS TO APPROACH. REPORTER: HOWEVER, THE PROBLEM AROMED HOW TO ENFORCE TSEHO CHANGES, WHETHER OR NOT A $100 PENALTY CAN BE INCLUDED, AND WHETHER LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS AFFECTING THE HOMELESS SHOULD BE MORE INVOLVED IN THE CHANGES. >> YOU SEE THE BARRIERS YOU HAVE TO ACCOMPLISHING THIS. RERTPO: THE COUNCIL SAYS AT ANY TIME THAT ABOUT 150 PEOPLE IN THE TOWN EXPERIENCE HOMELESSNESS. THE COUNCIL HAS VOTES TO ACCEPT THE CHANGES TO THE CODE WITHOUT CONSIDERING THE PENALTY. HOWEVER, THE MAYOR STRESSED THAT THE DISCUSSION AND EFFORTS TO IMPROVE THE SITUATION MUST KEEP ON. AND AHEAD OF THIS DISCUSSION AND VOTE, THE COUNCIL HEARED FROM A CITY HOUSING SPECIALIST TO PROVIDE CONTEXT ON THE SITUATION IN ELK GROVE. SHE HAS AN INTERESTING SAY. SHE SAID TO PEOPLE EXPERIENCING HOMELESSNESS IN THE CITY AND A THEY TOLD HER THAT THEY

Elk Grove City Council strengthens city ordinances to prevent illegal camping and camping

The council on Wednesday voted unanimously to add stricter guidelines to the city’s code, but chose not to include a $100 fine for people who don’t follow the rules.

Elk Grove City Council voted Wednesday night to add a chapter to the Elk Grove Municipal Code that will strengthen rules for illegal camping in the city. It was a unanimous decision, but was made after nearly an hour of debate among council members. “We know most of their names. We know who they are,” said Elk Grove Mayor Bobbie Singh-Allen. “We want to help transition out of this situation.” Singh-Allen called for compassion and urged the council to consider the unique barriers faced by people suffering from homelessness on any given day. The council set up an ad hoc committee in March to study concerns surrounding homelessness and find new ways to look at the problem, forestalling what they called a current situation on Wednesday. The committee’s recommended changes to the city’s ordinances were put on Wednesday’s agenda. However, it took about an hour of discussion before the council reached a unanimous decision on the matter, not conforming to the rules and issues regarding the role that organizations serving people with homelessness play in the process. within 500 feet of the premises of a daycare, school, playground or youth center. Prohibit camping in areas larger than 150 square feet per person. Prohibit camp sites defined as four or more people camping within 50 feet of each other without permitted power, water, and/or bathroom facilities. Require that camping areas be kept clean and free of trash, debris and debris. Prohibit picking or breaking locks on public facilities or preventing entry to public facilities, including locking city personnel out of a facility or public area. Prohibit blocking or blocking access to public facilities, sidewalks and/or other public pathways. “The camp process is getting out of hand in other cities and we need to act,” Councilor Stephanie Nguyen said. Nguyen and Councilor Pat Hume were on the committee that helped draft the proposed changes Alicia Tutt, a housing and grants specialist for the city, says homelessness affects about 150 people in the city at any given time. Tutt said research showed many of the individuals had ties to the city and reported feeling safer in Elk Grove than other parts of Sacramento County. “Honestly, there aren’t enough services,” she said. Tutt told the council that securing housing has become increasingly difficult due to the pandemic, property owners selling rental properties and a competitive pool of applicants. Problems, she said, are exacerbated for people with bad credit or a previous eviction.

Elk Grove City Council voted Wednesday night to add a chapter to the Elk Grove Municipal Code that will strengthen rules for illegal camping in the city.

It was a unanimous decision, but was made after nearly an hour of debate among council members.

“We know most of their names. We know who they are,” said Elk Grove Mayor Bobbie Singh-Allen. “We want to help get out of this situation.”

Singh-Allen called for compassion and urged the council to consider the unique barriers faced by people suffering from homelessness on any given day.

The council set up an ad hoc committee in March to study concerns surrounding homelessness and find new ways to look at the problem, forestalling what they called a current situation on Wednesday. The committee’s recommended changes to the city’s ordinances were put on Wednesday’s agenda.

However, it took about an hour of discussion before the Council reached a unanimous decision on the matter.

The issues raised were largely related to a proposed $100 fine for violators and questions about the role organizations helping the homeless should play in the process.

The council decided to amend the proposed changes, lift the fine and approved the new rules, including:

  • Prohibit camping (as defined) within 500 feet of the premises of a daycare, school, playground, or youth center.
  • Prohibit camping in areas larger than 150 square feet per person
  • Prohibit camps defined as four or more people camping within 50 feet of each other without permitted power, water, and/or bathroom facilities.
  • Require that camping areas be kept clean and free of trash, debris and litter.
  • Prohibit picking or breaking locks on public facilities or preventing entry to public facilities, including locking city employees out of a facility or public area.
  • Prohibit blocking or blocking access to public facilities, sidewalks and/or other public pathways

“The camp process is getting out of hand in other cities and we need to act,” Councilor Stephanie Nguyen said.

Nguyen and Councilor Pat Hume served on the committee that helped create the proposed changes.

“There’s an urgency to this part,” Hume said, encouraging the council to vote and remain open to continue working on the issue.

According to Alicia Tutt, a housing and grants specialist for the city, homelessness affects about 150 people in the city at any given time. Tutt said research showed many of the individuals had ties to the city and reported feeling safer in Elk Grove than other parts of Sacramento County.

“Honestly, there aren’t enough services,” she said.

Tutt told the council that securing housing has become increasingly difficult due to the pandemic, property owners selling rental properties and a competitive pool of applicants. Problems, she said, are exacerbated for people with bad credit or a previous eviction.

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