Three months later, residents’ lives are improving at Louisville’s first safe outdoor space – WLKY Louisville | Gmx Pharm

Hope Village is proving to be a successful community partnership to help homeless people in Louisville. In the first 90 days of its opening, staff at Metro’s first secure outdoor area have already helped move 10 of its residents into permanent housing. While the remaining 43 work to secure their own, they too have success stories due to the site’s resources, which include access to food, round-the-clock services, an all-weather tent and a portable shower. “Residents have found employment, others are participating in recovery programs, they have reunited their families and have undergone mental health treatment,” Mayor Greg Fischer said. Although a kind gesture, the gifts have two powerful benefits. First, they contribute to Louisville’s goal of creating clean air and a sustainable environment. “In the United States, gas mowers are responsible for 5% of the country’s air pollution. Louisville alone produces 20 1/2 million pounds of air pollution every year,” Fischer said. According to Hope Village operations staff, the equipment also provides residents with new skills to learn and one more task to complete to maintain their homes. “It’s an incredible way of teaching people responsibility when they move into a home,” said Stachelle Bussey, manager of Hope Village. “There’s a chore sign-up sheet where you take a chore, make a list, and take a job. Our residents are the ones maintaining the soil.” Angel Todd, operations manager at the East College Street site, said residents are proud of the site’s beautification efforts and excited for the opportunity to take advantage of the new gifts. “They’ve been biting down on the pieces to get their hands on them so they can take care of the space they live in,” Todd said. “It’s very rare that we need to remind people to do these things because they find value in their home.” This donation from Metro’s Air Pollution Control District is just one of many partnerships at the site. Coupled with grassroots organizations and volunteers who have spent more than 220 hours keeping the village alive, officials say this ability to unite for a needed cause is the best demonstration of community. “This city really came together and set the precedent,” Bussey said. “I think you need to help the whole city of Louisville now because that’s what we do and that’s what we can be if we’re a community that cares for each other.” As an added plus for the project To the Volunteers in Hope Village is owned by interns representing each college in Louisville.

Hope Village is proving to be a successful community partnership to help homeless people in Louisville.

In the first 90 days of its opening, staff at the subway’s first secure outdoor area have already helped 10 of its residents find permanent housing. While the remaining 43 work to secure their own, they too have success stories due to the site’s resources, which include access to food, round-the-clock services, an all-weather tent and a portable shower.

“Residents have found jobs, others are on recovery programs, have reunited their families and have undergone psychiatric treatment,” Mayor Greg Fischer said.

On Monday, the city’s commitment to lifting them continued with a donation of electric lawn equipment and a storage shed. Though a kind gesture, the gifts have two powerful benefits: One, contributes to Louisville’s goal of clean air and a sustainable environment.

“In the United States, gas mowers are responsible for 5% of the country’s air pollution. In Louisville alone, that causes 20 1/2 million pounds of air pollution every year,” Fischer said.

According to Hope Village operations staff, the equipment also provides residents with new skills to learn and one more task to complete in order to maintain their homes.

“It’s an incredible way of teaching people responsibility when they move into a home,” said Stachelle Bussey, manager of Hope Village. “There’s a chore sign-up sheet where you take a chore, make a list, and take a job. Our residents are the ones who maintain the soil.”

Angel Todd, operations manager at the East College Street site, said residents are proud of the space’s beautification efforts and excited for the opportunity to take advantage of the new gifts.

“They bit down on the pieces to get their hands on it, to take care of the space they live in,” Todd said. “It’s very rare that we need to remind people to do these things because they find value in their home.”

This donation from Metro’s Air Pollution Control District is just one of many partnerships at the site. Coupled with grassroots organizations and volunteers who have spent more than 220 hours keeping the village afloat, officials say this ability to unite for a needed cause is the community’s best demonstration.

“This city has really grown together and set the precedent,” Bussey said. “I think you have to help the whole city of Louisville right now because that’s what we do and that’s what we can be if we’re a community that cares about each other.”

As an added benefit to the project, Hope Village volunteers include interns representing each college in Louisville.

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